Wildlife is blooming with spring, but what about the orphans?

Sure, baby wildlife are cute, but they should be admired from a distance in most cases.

This red fox pup may look cute, but it is still a wild animal and should not be picked up or handled. Young foxes are cared for by both adults. — Photos by Paul J. Fusco

This red fox pup may look cute, but it is still a wild animal and should not be picked up or handled. Young foxes are cared for by both adults. — Photos by Paul J. Fusco

Spring and summer are busy times for people and animals. Many animals are setting up territories, building nests, or finding den sites to give birth and raise their young.

It is normal for many animals to leave their young alone for long periods of time, so your help may not be needed. In all likelihood, the adult is nearby watching and waiting to return.

White-tailed Deer: The only time a female (doe) will be found with a fawn is during feeding times. Fawns are fed three to four times a day, each feeding lasting about 15 minutes. During the long periods left alone, newborn fawns instinctively freeze and will lay motionless when approached.

“If you come across a fawn, it is best to leave it alone for at least 48 hours to determine whether the adult is returning for feedings,” said Rick Jacobson, director of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) Wildlife Division. “While waiting for the doe to return, it is important that both people and dogs stay away from the fawn. A truly orphaned fawn may show signs of distress by walking around aimlessly and calling out for several hours.”

Rabbits

Baby rabbits are one of the wild animals rescued most often, but usually do not need human help. Mother rabbits are only at the nest to feed their young twice a day for about five minutes.

Baby rabbits are one of the wild animals rescued most often, but usually do not need human help. Mother rabbits are only at the nest to feed their young twice a day for about five minutes.

Baby rabbits are one of the wild animals rescued most often, but usually do not need human help. Mother rabbits are only at the nest to feed their young twice a day for about five minutes — at dawn and dusk. And, yes, they really do put the nest in the middle of your backyard.

One reason for this is so the female can see any predators that may be approaching while she is nursing her young. Baby rabbits are only in the nest for two to three weeks before becoming independent. Leave the nest alone unless you find cold, limp, young, or obviously injured ones.

Birds

Many people find young birds hopping around the yard in June and July. Most of these birds are old enough to leave the nest, but are still not efficient fliers. If you find a fully-feathered, young bird that is unable to fly, it is best to leave it where it was found.

The adults are probably still caring for the young bird, which should be capable of flying within a few days. Remember to keep pets away from the bird and watch it closely for at least an hour to see if the adults are returning to feed it.

If you find a young bird on the ground that appears to not have feathers, look for a nest. If a nest is in a nearby tree or shrub and the bird feels warm to the touch, try to place the nestling back into the nest. If the nest has fallen on the ground, make a new nest with a wicker basket and some dry grasses and hang the basket with the nestling in it in a nearby tree or shrub.

Most birds have a poorly developed sense of smell and will not be scared away if you touched the young bird. Be sure to watch the nest carefully for at least an hour to see if the adults return to find and feed their nestling.

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